Course Descriptions

BIOLOGICAL, PHYSICAL, AND HUMAN SCIENCES

BPH 100/200/300. Special Topics in Science. 0.5 hours. F., Sp.
An every other week (100/200) [for 0.5 hour credit] or weekly (300) [for 1 hour credit] study of current topics in biology, chemistry, and biochemistry from peer-reviewed scientific literature. The course will familiarize students with technically written materials, laboratory techniques and instrumentation, and current trends in research.

BPH 400. Science Seminar. (W) 1 hour. F., Sp.
A weekly study of current topics in science from peer-reviewed literature that will familiarize students with technically written materials as well as laboratory techniques and instrumentation used in current research. This course should be taken during the final semester at which time the student will take the major field exam. This course includes a significant writing component. This course meets for one hour of lecture per week. Prerequisites: BPH 100, BPH 200, and BPH 300.

BIOLOGY

Most four-semester-hour biology courses meet for three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work each week during a regular semester.

BIO 100. Human Biology. 4 hours. Su., F.
A non-biology major's introduction to the basic structure and function of the human body and human genetics. Areas to which the students are introduced include: tissues, organs, and organ systems of the human body and their functions. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab each week. This course will not count as credit toward a biology major or minor.

BIO 110. Principles of Biology. 3 hours. Su., F., Sp.
A study of biology for non-majors. Emphasis will be on basic biological concepts that will enable students to appreciate the living world and their relationship to it. Topics will include, but are not limited to, scientific method, the cell and genetic basis of life, mitosis and meiosis reproduction, biodiversity, and ecology. This course meets for three hours each week. A laboratory component will be included in this course. This course will not count as credit toward a biology major or minor.

BIO 111. General Biology I. 4 hours. F.
A general survey of the major kingdoms (except Anamalia) and the phyla of plants throughout the world. This course introduces students to basic cell structure, energy transfer, metabolic processes, reproduction, taxonomic, and ecological aspects of plants. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.

BIO 112. General Biology II. 4 hours. Sp.
A general survey of the major animal-like protists and animal phyla throughout the world. This course also introduces students to basic cell structure, cell division, reproduction, and genetics. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.

BIO 115. Medical Terminology. 1 hour. F.
A study of the basic knowledge and understanding of medical language and terminology used by healthcare professionals. Students will learn and recognize word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in medical language today. Medical terms related to all major body systems will be covered. This course meets for one hour of lecture per week.

BIO 205. Cell Biology. 3 hours. F., Sp.
An introduction to the biology of cells. This course will emphasize the study of eukaryotic cell structure and function, including bioenergetics, membrane transport, cellular communication, flow of genetic information, immune responses, and cell division. Experimental techniques used in understanding cell biology will be discussed along with the cellular basis of human diseases.

BIO 211. Human Anatomy and Physiology I. 4 hours. Su., F., Sp.
Part one of a two-semester study of the structure and function of the human body. This course orients the student with the major chemistry, cell biology, and tissue structure of the human body then continues with examination of the gross and microscopic anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous body systems. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.

BIO 212. Human Anatomy and Physiology II. 4 hours. F., Sp.
Part two of a two-semester study of the structure and function of the human body. This course examines the gross and microscopic anatomy and physiology of the circulatory, immune, respiratory, digestive, excretory, reproductive, and endocrine body systems then orients students to concepts in human pregnancy, development, and genetics. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: BIO 211 Human Anatomy and Physiology I or permission of the instructor.

BIO 215. Microbiology. 4 hours. Sp.
A survey of the microbial world. Emphasis will be on bacteria and viruses. Students will be introduced to the history of microbiology, cellular structures, metabolisms, microbial genetics, techniques of studying microbes, microbes and diseases, and environmental microbiology. Strong importance is placed on the laboratory portion of this course. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Prerequisites: BIO 111 General Biology I or CHE 121 General Chemistry I or CHE 111 Biochemistry for Health Sciences.

BIO 311. Entomology. 4 hours. On demand.
A study of the structure, classification, control, life cycle, and economic importance of insects. A collection of principle orders of insects is required. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab or field work per week. This course is an upper-division zoology course. Prerequisite: BIO 112 General Biology II

BIO 312. Histology. 3 hours. Sp., Even years.
The anatomical and physiological studies of mammalian tissues with focus on the light microscope. This course will analyze the structure and function of the four basic tissue types then proceed to an examination of the major organs and organ systems of the body. Emphasis will be placed on human histology. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. This course is an upper-division zoology course. Prerequisites: BIO 211 and 212 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II

BIO 318. Pathophysiology. 3 hours. F.
A study of the pathological effects of altered physiology of each major organ system. Particular attention will be given to major diseases that affect the U.S. population. Critical thinking, research findings, and scientific knowledge are applied to analyze clinical implications and potential treatments. This course meets for three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: CHE 121 and CHE 121L General Chemistry I and Lab or CHE 111 Biochemistry for the Health Sciences, BIO 211 Human Anatomy and Physiology I, Prequisite: BIO 212 Human Anatomy and Physiology II.

BIO 321. Ecology. (W) 4 hours. F.
An introduction to the study of the interrelationships between organisms and their environments. Global cycles and implications will be included. Field trips are required. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab or field work per week. This course includes a significant writing component. Prerequisites: BIO 111 General Biology I and BIO 112 General Biology II

BIO 323. Plant Taxonomy. 4 hours. Sp.
A study of the principles of naming, identification, and classification of plants. Laboratory work stresses the structural characteristics of vascular plant families and the use of field manuals in identifying components and provides opportunities to prepare herbarium specimens of the local flora. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab or field work per week. This course is an upper-division botany course. Prerequisite: BIO 111 General Biology I

BIO 331. Vertebrate Zoology. 4 hours. F., Even years.
Comparisons of the systems of vertebrates. Emphasis will be on systematics, morphology, and natural history of the vertebrates. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. This course is an upper-division zoology course. Prerequisite: BIO 112 General Biology II. Recommended: BIO 211 and BIO 212 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II

BIO 333. Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics. 4 hours. F.
A study of the structure and physiology of the eukaryotic cell and gene expression. Topics include cell boundary, the secretory and endocytic pathways, gene expression, gene regulation, cell signaling, cell division, cellular respiration, the cytoskeleton, and techniques in cellular and molecular research. This course meets for three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: BIO 111 General Biology I

BIO 335. Genetics. 4 hours. Sp.
An introduction to the basic concepts and principles of heredity. This course includes a study of classical genetics, modern molecular genetics, probability, and population genetics. Focus will be placed on problem-solving skills in addition to understanding core concepts. This course meets for three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: BIO 111 and BIO 112 General Biology I and II

BIO 345. Wildlife Ecology. (W) 4 hours. On demand.
A study of the ecology of wildlife species of the southeastern United States. All major wildlife taxa will be included (birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians) with special emphasis on natural history and management. This course will involve a significant lab (field) component and may require some extended field trips. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab or field work per week. This course includes a significant writing component. This course is an upper-division zoology course. Prerequisites: BIO 112 General Biology II; Recommended: BIO 321 Ecology

BIO 355. Natural Resource Conservation. (W) 4 hours. F., Even years.
An integrated study of environmental problems, connections, and solutions that center on renewable and nonrenewable resources. Field trips will be required. This course includes a significant writing component. Same as PHS 355

BIO 415. Field Biology. (W) 4 hours. On demand.
Sampling methods and field techniques applicable to the biota of the southern United States. Students will gain field experience in the study of plant and animal life in selected habitats and the impacts of climate and soils on geographic distributions. Students will design and carry out a field study and will interpret the results, culminating in a written report. This course meets for thee hours of lecture and three house of lab or field work per week. This course includes a significant writing component. Prerequisite: BIO 321 Ecology

BIO 416. Herpetology. (W) 4 hours. Sp., Even years.
The morphology, systematics, behavior, ecology, and zoogeography of amphibians and reptiles. Emphasis will be on taxa from the southeastern U.S. This course will meet for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab or field work per week. This course includes a significant writing component. This course is an upper-division zoology course. Prerequisite: BIO 112 General Biology II; Recommended: BIO 321 Ecology

BIO 417. Animal Behavior. (W) 4 hours. F., Odd years.
The function, ecology, and development of animal behavior. This course introduces students to the major fields of study within the discipline of animal behavior. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab or field work per week. This course includes a significant writing component. This course is an upper-division zoology course. Prerequisite: BIO 112 General Biology II; Recommended: BIO 321 Ecology

BIO 422. Embryology. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of fertilization, patterning, cell differentiation, organogenesis, and regeneration in vertebrates. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. A $40 lab fee is charged. This course is an upper-division zoology course. Prerequisites: BIO 111 and BIO 112 General Biology I and II

BIO 444. Biological Concepts of Origins. (W) 3 hours. Sp.
A discussion-based class on the concepts of biological origins. This course includes assigned readings, student discussions, and mini-lectures on modern theories of origins, evolution, and creationism. Class participation is required. This course includes a significant writing component. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of science courses or permission from the instructor

BIO 498. Research (Offered by Individual Instruction). (W) 1-3 hours.
A research participation course for advanced science students. Students will work closely with the instructor on a research topic of mutual interest. Students should enroll for at least two successive semesters. A research paper is required. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Offered by Individual Instruction. This course contains a significant writing component.

CHEMISTRY

Most four-semester-hour chemistry courses meet for three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work each week during a regular semester. 


CHE 111. Biochemistry for the Health Sciences. 4 hours. F.
An overview of organic and inorganic chemistry, biochemistry, and physics. Emphasis will be on the application of chemistry in the realm of health sciences. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.

CHE 121. General Chemistry I. 3 hours. F.
A study of the basic concepts of general chemistry. This study will include the atomic theory, atomic structure, chemical bonding, the periodic law, and calculations relating to stoichiometry and the gas laws. Co-requisite: CHE121L General Chemistry I Lab.

CHE 121L. General Chemistry I Lab. 1 hour. F.
Special emphasis given to quantitative methods. This lab meets for three hours each week. Co-requisite: CHE121 General Chemistry I.

CHE 122. General Chemistry II. 3 hours. Sp.
A continuation of CHE 121. This course includes the study of oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, chemical equilibria, and a survey of the most common elements. Pre-requisite: CHE 121 General Chemistry I. Co-requisite: CHE 122L General Chemistry II Lab.

CHE 122L. General Chemistry II Lab. 1 hour. Sp.
Special emphasis given to quantitative methods. This lab meets for three hours each week. Prerequisite: CHE 121L General Chemistry I Lab. Co-requisite: CHE 122 General Chemistry II.

CHE 221. Analytical Chemistry. 4 hours. F., Even years.
A study of the theory involved in qualitative and quantitative analyses. Laboratory stresses gravimetric and volumetric analyses. This course meets for two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CHE 122 and CHE 122L General Chemistry II and Lab.

CHE 222. Instrumental Analysis. 4 hours. Sp., Odd years.
A study of the theory and application of spectroscopic and chromatographic instrumental techniques. Lecture topics will include the theory, instrument design, operation, and maintenance for: x-ray fluorescence, infrared, atomic, molecular, and luminescence spectroscopy, gas and high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. This course meets for two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CHE 122 and CHE 122L General Chemistry II and Lab.

CHE 321. Organic Chemistry I. (W) 4 hours. F.
A study of the preparation, properties, reaction mechanisms, reactions, nomenclature, structure, and analyses of organic molecules. This course includes the basics of molecular orbital theory as applied to organic molecules, intermolecular forces, infrared spectroscopy, acid/base mechanisms, nomenclature, stereochemistry, and the properties of alkenes and alkynes. This course meets for three hours of lecture per week and three hours of lab per week. Prerequisites: CHE122 and 122L General Chemistry II and Lab.

CHE 322. Organic Chemistry II. (W) 4 hours. Sp.
A study of the preparation, properties, reaction mechanisms, reactions, nomenclature, structure, and analyses of organic molecules. This course includes structure determination using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy and reactions/mechanisms of free radicals, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and aromatic compounds. This course meets for three hours of lecture per week and three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: CHE 321 Organic Chemistry I.

CHE 331. Biochemistry I. (W) 4 hours. F.
A study of the physical chemistry of biomolecules. This course includes the study of cells, water, amino acids, proteins, enzyme kinetics, and nucleic acids. This course meets for three hours of lecture per week and three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: CHE 322 Organic Chemistry II.

CHE 332. Biochemistry II. (W) 4 hours. Sp.
A study of the chemistry and metabolism of biomolecules. This course includes a study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins including glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. This course meets for three hours of lecture per week and one and one half hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: CHE 331 Biochemistry I.

CHE 356. Aquatic Chemistry. (W) 4 hours. F., Even years.
An introduction to the chemical, biological, and physical scientific principles and methods of the examination of aqueous environments. Emphasis is placed on the laboratory portion of this course. This course meets for one and one half hours of lecture and four and one half hours of lab or fieldwork per week. Field trips will be required. This course includes a significant writing component. Prerequisites: BIO 111 General Biology I or BIO 112 General Biology II, CHE 122, 122L, General Chemistry II and Lab. CHE 321 Organic Chemistry I is suggested.

CHE 410. Inorganic Chemistry. 3 hours. Sp., Odd years.
A study of modern concepts of inorganic chemistry, including electronic structures, molecular structures, and periodic classification of the elements. Additional topics will be selected from the following areas: bonding theories, quantum theory, solid state theory, transition metal complexes, methods of structural determination, group theory, bioinorganic chemistry, and instrumental techniques currently used in inorganic chemistry. Prerequisites: MAT 122 Analytics and Calculus I and CHE 322 Organic Chemistry II.

CHE 421. Quantum Chemistry. 4 hours. F., Odd years.
A study of quantum mechanics and its description of chemical systems. Fundamental atomic properties will be explained such that application can be made to atomic and molecular systems that lead to a deep understanding of wave functions and their use in describing chemical bonds, motion, rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectra, and the electric and magnetic properties of utilizing approximation methods, group theory and computer assistance. This course meets for three hours of lecture per week and three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: PHS 212 Physics for Science and Engineering II.

CHE 422. Chemical Kinetics and Thermodynamics. 4 hours. Sp., Even years.
A study of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics in gas, liquid, and solid phases. This course meets for three hours of lecture per week and three hours of lab per week.

CHE 431. Cellular and Molecular Immunology. 3 hours. Sp.
A comprehensive study of the immune system with emphasis on medical immunology. This course includes the study of innate and specific acquired immunity; the chemistry of complement, antibodies, antigens, membrane receptors for antigens; lymphocyte activation; ontogeny; infection; immunodeficiency; transplantation; tumor immunology and autoimmune diseases. This course will meet for three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: CHE 331 Biochemistry I.

CHE 498. Research (offered by Individual Instruction). (W) 1-3 hours. On demand.
A research participation course for advanced science students. Students will work closely with the instructor on a research topic of mutual interest. This course includes a significant writing component. Pre-requisite: Junior or senior standing and permission of the instructor. Offered only by Individual Instruction.

ENGINEERING SCIENCES

ENS 101. Introduction to Engineering. 2 hours. F.
An introduction to engineering and the engineering profession. Lecture topics will include the engineering problem solving method, introduction to design, basic problem solving and computer skills, study and personal development skills. This course meets for two one-hour lecture periods per week.

ENS 103. Engineering Graphics. 3 hours. Sp.
An introduction to graphic expression and communication. Topics will include technical sketching, multi-view projection, isometric and oblique projection, graphic representation, and analysis of data. Advanced topics to include auxiliary views, oblique views, line and plane problems, and surfaces will be introduced. Computer graphics are used alongside board drafting to introduce state-of-the-art engineering drawing production. This course meets for one and one-half hours of lecture and four and one-half hours of laboratory per week.

ENS 231. Engineering Mechanics I (Statics). 3 hours. F.
A study of the principles of statics. Lecture topics will include resistant force systems, equilibrium of force systems, analysis of structures in two and three dimensions, friction, centroids, centers of gravity, and moments of inertia. This course meets for three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: MAT 122 Analytics and Calculus I.

ENS 232. Engineering Mechanics II (Dynamics). 3 hours. Sp.
A study of the principles of dynamics. Lecture topics will include a study of particles and rigid bodies as to kinematics, kinetics, work, and energy, impulse and momentum; and an introduction to mechanical vibrations. This course meets for three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: ENS 231 Engineering Mechanics I and PHS 211 Physics for Science and Engineering I.

HEALTH

HEA121. Principles of Nutrition. 3 hours. F., Sp.
A study of nutrition, incorporating the fundamental scientific principles to the science of nutrition. Students examine concepts and controversies to develop their own nutritional lifestyle compatible with the principles of sound nutrition. Same as FCS 121.

HEA216. Personal Health. 3 hours. Su., F., Sp.
Introduction to personal health concepts. This course endeavors to make each student health conscious. The course includes fundamental biological facts and the psychological aspects of human behavior as they affect the health conduct of the individual.

HEA217. First Aid and CPR. 2 hours. Su., F., Sp.
Practical first aid and CPR course. The American Red Cross Standard First Aid Course is covered. Students may qualify for a Red Cross certificate.

HEA310. Community Health. 3 hours. On demand.
Survey of health problems requiring community action. An introduction to the official and unofficial health agencies whose programs are designed for prevention of disease and preservation of health. Activities in the areas of environmental health, sanitation, epidemiology, and related areas are included.

HEA316. Substance Abuse Education. 3 hours. On demand.
Study of the abuse of drugs in our society. An emphasis is placed on content, resources, and methods in drug education.

HEA335. Human Sexuality. 3 hours. Sp.
A survey of the complex social, psychological, and spiritual aspects of human sexuality. Emphasis will be on a responsible view of sexuality as a part of life adjustment. Same as FAM 335.

HEA410. The School Health Program. 3 hours. On demand.
An introduction to the total school health program. Organization of the total school health program, including health services, healthful school environment, and health instruction. Emphasis is placed on: methods of organizing and implementing health services in the schools; screening tests, detection of defects, and follow-up; and the promotion of health through the school environment.

KINESIOLOGY

KIN 100. Fundamentals of Movement. 1 hour. F., Sp.
Introduction to basic childhood movement activities. Topics addressed include perceptual/motor programs, movement education, aerobic exercise, and rhythmic activities. The primary emphasis will be focused toward activities for elementary school children.

KIN 120. Foundations of Kinesiology. (W) 3 hours. F.
Disciplines and professions associated with kinesiology and related areas. The course will present an introduction to the constituent sub-disciplines (exercise physiology, biomechanics, motor learning, sport psychology, health, recreation, etc.) within and related to kinesiology. The skills and competencies related to kinesiology as well as various educational, professional and career opportunities available to students will be examined during the course. This course includes a significant writing component.

KIN 205. Camp Leadership. 2 hours. On demand.
Introduction to camp leadership. This course is designed to help those interested in camp work learn to administer and organize different activities in connection with the religious, recreational, and educational aspects of the camping program.

KIN 221. Protective Techniques for Athletic Injuries. 2 hours. Sp.
Basic taping and wrapping techniques. This course is designed to present students with specific aspects concerning the application of any taping and/or wrapping for the prevention and management of sports injuries. By examining major joints and muscle groups, students will master step-by-step taping and bracing techniques.

KIN 225. Physical Activities for Children. 2 hours. F., Sp.
Theory and activities for physical education in the elementary grades. Students plan and participate in movement and learning activities for elementary school children.

KIN 320. Measurement and Evaluation of Physical Education. (W) 3 hours. F.
Study of measurement and evaluation procedures. This class will incorporate application of statistical procedures; use of tests in school programs and selection of tests for evaluating motor ability, sports skills, physical fitness, knowledge, and the affective domain. Measurement and evaluation of fitness programs in non-school settings is included. This course contains a significant writing component.

KIN 327. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. (W) 3 hours. F.
Introduction to basic athletic training. The student will develop an awareness and understanding of the basic injury prevention, treatment, management, and rehabilitation techniques employed in sports medicine. Sport medicine terms, basic anatomy as it relates to various types of injuries and the application of the various taping, bandaging, and strapping techniques employed in sports medicine will be examined. This course contains a significant writing component.

KIN 328. Anatomical Kinesiology. 3 hours. Sp.
Survey of anatomical aspects of human movement. This course is a study of the anatomical aspects of the human body with an emphasis on the relationship of anatomy to the study of physical activity, physical fitness, sport, and exercise. The course will help the student understand how the structure of the human body determines its functions and the movements produced. Prerequisite: BIO 100 Human Biology or BIO 211 Human Anatomy and Physiology I.

KIN 329. Biomechanics of Human Movement. 3 hours. F.
Presents the mechanical basis of human movement. Fundamental mechanical principles affecting human movement will be examined. Various techniques and methods of analyzing human motion will be discussed. Prerequisite: KIN 328 Anatomical Kinesiology.

KIN 330. Advanced Athletic Training I. 3 hours. Sp., Even years.
Presents specific signs, symptoms and mechanical causes of a variety of athletic injuries dealing specifically with the upper body. The focus of this course will be in the recognition and assessment of injuries to the upper body and the recommended treatment procedures. This course will also examine the fundamental principles of sports injury management. Prerequisites: KIN 327 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries and either BIO 100 Human Biology or BIO 211 Human Anatomy and Physiology I.

KIN 331. Advanced Athletic Training II. 3 hours. Sp., Odd years.
Presents specific signs, symptoms and mechanical causes of a variety of athletic injuries dealing specifically with the lower body. The focus of this course will be in the recognition and assessment of injuries to the lower body, specific tests used to evaluate those injuries, recommended treatment procedures, and potential rehabilitation protocols. Prerequisites: KIN 327 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries, and either BIO 100 Human Biology or BIO 211 Human Anatomy and Physiology I.

KIN 338. Physiology of Exercise. 3 hours. F.
Physiological aspects of human movement. This course examines physiological responses and adjustments that occur in selected organ systems when subjected to acute and chronic exercise. The course will center primarily on the physiological mechanisms pertaining to metabolic, cardiovascular, and respiratory alterations. Prerequisite: BIO 100 Human Biology or BIO 211 Human Anatomy and Physiology I.

KIN397. Practicum in Exercise Science. 1-6 hours hours. On demand.
Practicum experience for Exercise Science majors. This is a professional field experience conducted under the supervision of an experienced professional in the student's chosen area of Exercise Science, who must be approved by the university. Students must have completed 45 hours and be a Kinesiology or Exercise Science major. First Aid and CPR is expected. Close contact is maintained between the field supervisor and the faculty supervisor. A minimum of 40 clock hours of field activity is required for one credit hour. Grading is conventional.

KIN 420. Motor Learning. 2 hours. Sp., Even years.
The course examines the methods and techniques involved in the acquisition of motor skills. Emphasis will be placed and research will be examined regarding variables which affect skill acquisition, such as: motivation, length and methods of practice, feedback mechanisms, and retention and transfer of motor skills. Prerequisite: KIN 320 Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education.

KIN 425. Organization and Administration of Physical Education. (W) 3 hours. F.
A study of the principles of organization and administration of school physical education programs. Consideration is given to personnel, tournaments, equipment and facilities, records, finance, legal aspects, publicity, public relations, and safety. This course includes a significant writing component.

KIN 426. Adaptive Physical Education. (W) 3 hours. Sp.
This course is designed to aid in the understanding of the exceptional child and his or her relationship to the physical education activities. This course includes a significant writing component. Same as SPE 426.

KIN 437. Exercise Testing and Prescription. 3 hours. Sp.
This course is designed to introduce students to various physiological testing protocols, fitness and nutritional evaluations, exercise designs and the underlying theoretical principles involved in each procedure. Students will have hands-on experience utilizing these tests with “clients” from the FHU “family.” Prerequisites: HEA/FCS 121 Elementary Nutrition, KIN 320 Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education, and KIN 338 Physiology of Exercise.

KIN 497. Senior Practicum in Exercise Science. 1-6 hours. On demand.
This is a professional field experience conducted under the supervision of an experienced professional in the student’s chosen area of Exercise Science, who must be approved by the university. The student must have senior standing (90 hours). Pre- and/or co-requisites include the following courses: KIN 121 Elementary Nutrition, KIN 327 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries, KIN 328 Anatomical Kinesiology, KIN 329 Biomechanics of Human Movement, KIN 338 Physiology of Exercise, and KIN 437 Exercise Testing and Prescription. Current certification in First Aid and CPR is required. Depending on the student’s future field of endeavor, other courses are either highly recommended or required. Cooperation between the student and his/her adviser in selecting additional courses cannot be overstated. Failure to do so may have a negative impact on the student’s academic preparation.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY

Each student must take PEA 100 Lifetime Wellness as one of the two hours of PEA credit that are necessary for graduation. A student may take more than two hours if he/she desires. Emphasis is placed on the rules, fundamental skills, safety practices, and terminology of each activity. Only majors and minors in Kinesiology and Exercise Science may take PEA 235 Fundamentals of Sports Skills, unless permission is obtained from the Kinesiology program coordinator. 

Kinesiology majors are required to take at least seven hours of activity classes. Majors are encouraged to also enroll in those activities in which they possess little or no skill.

PEA 100. Lifetime Wellness. 1 hour. F., Sp.
Designed to acquaint the student with those lifestyle practices that improve one's quality of life. These practices such as adequate nutrition, aerobic fitness, stress reduction, etc. can lead one to a longer, more productive life. Self-assessment activities will be incorporated into the class.

PEA 130. Aerobic Activities. 1 hour. F., Sp.
Introduction to aerobic fitness. This course is designed to form a solid base upon which the student may achieve and maintain personal cardiovascular fitness throughout their life. An effort will be made to improve the student's present state of physical fitness.

PEA 136. Beginning Tumbling. 1 hour. F.
Introduction to basic tumbling. This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamental concepts and movements involved in tumbling and gymnastics. The primary emphasis will be understanding and mastering the basic skills of tumbling and the safety procedures used in spotting and injury prevention.

PEA 146. Badminton and Volleyball. 1 hour. On demand.
Introduction to beginning badminton and volleyball. This course is designed to develop enough skill in the beginning badminton and volleyball player so that he/she may derive enjoyment and satisfaction from their participation.

PEA 148. Beginning Tennis. 1 hour. F., Sp.
Introduction to beginning tennis. This course is designed to develop enough skill in the beginning tennis player so that he/she may derive enjoyment and satisfaction from their participation.

PEA 149. Beginning Bowling. 1 hour. F., Sp.
Introduction to beginning bowling. This course is designed to develop enough skill in the beginning bowler so that he/she may derive enjoyment and satisfaction from their participation.

PEA 150. Racquetball. 1 hour. Su., F., Sp.
Introduction to beginning racquetball. This course is designed to develop enough skill in the beginning racquetball player so that he/she may derive enjoyment and satisfaction from their participation.

PEA 155. Beginning Golf. 1 hour. On demand.
Introduction to beginning golf. This course is designed to develop enough skill in the beginning golf player so that he/she may derive enjoyment and satisfaction from their participation.

PEA 156M and PEA 156W. Weight Training. 1 hour. F., Sp.
Introduction to basic weight training. This course is designed to introduce the student to the methods and aid the students in the development of muscular fitness through progressive weight training.

PEA 165M and PEA 165W. Beginning Swimming. 1 hour. On demand.
Introduction to basic water skills. The student will learn basic swimming skills, including rhythmical breathing and the basic front crawl, back crawl, elementary backstroke and sidestroke, as listed in the American Red Cross skills levels, I-III.

PEA 166M and PEA 166W. Intermediate Swimming. 1 hour. F., Sp.
Continuation of the development of swimming and safety skills as required by the American Red Cross, Levels I-III. The student MUST be able to rhythmically breathe and demonstrate the front crawl, back crawl, and elementary backstroke skills. Swimming skills to be developed include those listed in the American Red Cross skills levels, IV-VI.

PEA 167M and PEA 167W. Lifeguard Training 1 hour. Sp.
Introduction to lifeguard training. The course offers the basic lifesaving certification as prescribed by the American Red Cross, including a period of condition. REQUIREMENTS: Students MUST be able to swim 300 yards continuously using these strokes in the following order: 100 yards with the front crawl using rhythmic breathing; 100 yards with the breast stroke; 100 yards with either the front crawl or the breast stroke. CPR and First Aid are NOT prerequisites for this course.

PEA 168. Rhythmic Activities. 1 hour. F., Sp.
Introduction to rhythms and recreation games. Students will design and demonstrate various rhythms and recreational games that involve a variety of educational activities.

PEA 170. Beginning Tae Kwon Do. 1 hour. F., Sp.
Introduces a working knowledge of the fundamental techniques used in Tae Kwon Do. This course is designed to introduce the student to the movements, forms, and philosophies that are used in the Korean martial art of Tae Kwon Do. The students will learn the art of using the hands and feet for quality self-defense.

PEA 171. Intermediate Tae Kwon Do. 1 hour. Sp.
Continuation of a development of a working knowledge of the fundamental techniques used in PEA 170. This course is designed to train the intermediate student in the movements, forms, and philosophies that are used in the Korean martial art of Tae Kwon Do. The students will learn the art of using the hands and feet for quality self-defense. Prerequisite: PEA 170 Beginning Tae Kwon Do or permission from the instructor.

PEA 180. Beginning Freshwater Fishing. 1 hour. Su.
Introduces a working knowledge of the fundamental techniques used in freshwater fishing. This course is designed to introduce the student to fishing techniques and skills necessary to derive enjoyment from participation.

PEA 235. Fundamentals of Sports Skills. 3 hours. F.
Introduction to rules, fundamental skills, and teaching techniques of individual, dual and team sports. Open only to majors and minors in physical education or by special permission. This course does NOT meet general education requirements.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

PHS 111. Physical Science I. 3 hours. F., Sp.
An introduction to the physical sciences including topics from geology, introductory chemistry, and astronomy. Designed for the non-science major, this course has a lab component and will meet for three hours each week.

PHS 112. Physical Science II. 3 hours. Sp.
An introduction to the physical sciences including topics from general physics and meteorology. Designed for the non–science major, this course has a lab component and will meet for three hours each week.

PHS 201. General Physics I. (W) 4 hours. F.
An algebra–based study of physics. This course introduces students to kinematics in one and two dimensions, kinetics, friction, work, energy, momentum, rotational dynamics, gravitation, static equilibrium, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, waves, and sound. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisite: MAT 120 Precalculus.

PHS 202. General Physics II. (W) 4 hours. Sp.
A continuation of PHS 201. This course introduces students to electric forces and fields, capacitance, AC and DC circuits, magnetic fields, inductance, electromagnetic waves, light, optics, interference, diffraction, and selected topics from modern physics. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisite: PHS 201 General Physics I.

PHS 211. Physics for Science and Engineering I. (W) 4 hours. F.
A calculus–based study of physics designed primarily for students majoring in chemistry, mathematics, computer science, and pre–engineering. This course is required of all pre– engineering, chemistry, and biochemistry students and is recommended for students certifying to teach physics in the secondary schools. This course introduces students to kinematics in one and two dimensions, kinetics, friction, work, energy, momentum, rotational dynamics, gravitation, static equilibrium, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, waves, and sound. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisite: MAT 122 Analytics and Calculus I.

PHS 212. Physics for Science and Engineering II. (W) 4 hours. Sp.
A continuation of PHS 211 and a requirement of all pre–engineering, chemistry, and biochemistry students. This course introduces students to thermodynamics, the kinetic theory of gases, electric fields and potential, capacitance, resistance, AC and DC circuits, magnetic fields, inductance, electromagnetic waves, light, optics, interference, diffraction, and selected topics dealing with relativity, quantum mechanics, and nuclear physics. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisite: PHS 211 Physics for Science and Engineering I.

PHS 355. Natural Resource Conservation. (W) 4 hours. F., Even years.
A comprehensive overview of the modern field of natural resources and environment. This course focuses on identifying and defining concepts required to understand the Earth's natural resources and to participate intelligently in their conservation and management. This course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of lab or field work per week. This course includes a significant writing component. Same as BIO 355.

TOPICAL SEMINARS BIO 299B/399B. Biology of Freshwater Game Fishes. 3 hours. Su.
A study of the morphology, systematics, behavior, ecology, and zoogeography of freshwater game fishes. Emphasis will be on taxa from the southeastern United States. This course includes field trips.

BIO 299D/399D. Substance Abuse. 3 hours. Sp.
A study of narcotics and other dangerous drugs, including alcohol. Historical background, physical, psychological, and other aspects of addiction; dependency, and legal aspects will be considered.

BIO 299F/399F. Nature Study. 3 hours. Sp.
An introduction to the local plants and animals, biological communities, and other phases of our natural surroundings. Other current topics that pertain to the environment may also be introduced.

BIO 299G/399G. Field Research. 3 hours. On demand.
An extended field trip designed to acquaint students with field–oriented research. Emphasis will be on the collection and analysis of scientific data.

BIO 299I/399I. Environmental Pollution. 3 hours. Sp.
An introduction to the major causes of environmental pollution. Environmental policies and the economic implications of pollution will be emphasized. Same as PHS 299B/399B.

HEA 299F/399F. Substance Abuse. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of narcotics and other dangerous drugs, including alcohol. Historical background, physical, psychological, and other aspects of addiction and dependency and legal aspects will be considered. Same as BIO 299D/399D, EDU 299A/399A, and PHS 299A/399A.

KIN 299A/399A. Coaching Basketball. 3 hours. On demand.
Introduction to coaching basketball. The philosophy, techniques, and coaching strategies for basketball are covered in this course. Students are introduced to safety, budgeting, scheduling, and conditioning.

KIN 299C/399C. Coaching Baseball. 3 hours. On demand.
Introduction to coaching baseball. This course is designed to introduce the student to the profession of coaching baseball. Attempts will be made to cover all aspects involved in the development of a program. Emphasis is placed on a high school program; however, techniques can be utilized from summer leagues through the professional ranks.

KIN 299E/399E. Philosophy and Techniques of Coaching. 3 hours. On demand.
Introduction to theories and philosophies of coaching. This course deals with coaching principles and philosophy that apply to all sports. Human relations, motivation, scheduling, budgeting, and public relations are discussed.

KIN 299I/399I. Sociology of Sport. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of the place of sport in American culture. Sport will be studied from the perspective of sociology. Same as SOC 299B/399B.

PEA 299I. Dayhiking. 1 hour. Su.
Beginning dayhiking class. This course offers an opportunity to learn and participate in a lifetime related sport, dayhiking. The students hike trails in nearby state parks, learning first–hand correct techniques of hiking while enjoying and learning about nature.

PEA 299J. Beginning Canoeing. 1 hour. Su.
Beginning canoeing class. This course is designed to instill in the student the fundamental skills and safety involved in canoeing on still water.

PEA 299N. Pickleball and Table Tennis. 1 hour. Su.
Pickleball and table tennis introduction. The rules, fundamentals, skills, and playing strategies of pickleball and table tennis will be emphasized.

PHS299A/399A. Substance Abuse. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of narcotics and other dangerous drugs, including alcohol. Historical background, physical, psychological, and other aspects of addiction, dependency, and legal aspects will be considered. Same as BIO 299D/399D, EDU 299A/399A, and HEA 299F/399F.

PHS 299I/399I. Environmental Pollution. 3 hours.
An introduction to the major causes of environmental pollution. Environmental policies and the economic implications of pollution will be emphasized. Same as BIO 299I/399I.