Course Descriptions

HIS 111. Survey of Civilization I. 3 hours. F.
A survey of world history from the fourth millennium B.C. into the sixteenth century. Particular attention is paid to change over time, connections and cultural exchanges between different peoples, and comparisons between different civilizations.

HIS 112. Survey of Civilization II. 3 hours. Sp.
This is a continuation of HIS 111. This course surveys world history from the sixteenth century to the present, and examines the relationships between nationalism, industrialization, imperialism, political ideologies, and globalization.

HIS 221. American History I. 3 hours. Su., F., Sp.
A survey of United States history from pre-Columbian times to 1877. This course is a survey of the major events including colonization, American Revolution, national expansion, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

HIS 222. American History II. 3 hours. F., Sp.
This is a continuation of HIS 221. This course is a survey of major developments including expansion, industrialization, reform, foreign policy, politics, and cultural changes.

HIS 314. Ancient and Classical Civilizations. (W) 3 hours. Sp., Even years.
Study of the history, literature, political structures, and religion of the Near East, Greece and Rome from about 3,500 B.C. to the fourth century A.D. This course contains a significant writing component.

HIS 320. Diversity in America. (W) 3 hours. F., Sp.
An examination of the social and cultural differences that are present in the American population. This course will examine cultures and subgroups in the American community in a historical, legal and social context. This course contains a significant writing component. Same as HUM/POL 320.

HIS 323. American Colonial and Early National Period, 1500-1800. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of early American history from colonization through the Federalist period.

HIS 324. American Political Biography. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of the lives, achievements and contributions of outstanding Americans to the political history of the country. Same as POL 324.

HIS325. The Civil War. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of the causes and effects of the American Civil War. The course examines the political, military, social and economic changes of this pivotal time in American history.

HIS 326. History of Tennessee. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of the political, social, cultural, and economic development of Tennessee from 1796 to the present.

HIS 337. Research and Writing of History I. (W) 3 hours. F.
An introduction to the historian's craft, including a survey of historiography and of careers for majors. This course introduces students to research in primary and secondary sources and to the process of framing a historical argument, producing written work that demonstrates critical thinking, and submitting that work to peer review. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisites: HIS 111 and 112 Survey of Civilization I and II; or HIS 221 and 222 American History I and II; or permission from the instructor.

HIS 338. Research and Writing of History II. (W) 3 hours. Sp.
Guides students through the process of researching and writing a major research paper. This course emphasizes the writing of clear historical prose, which includes multiple drafts and peer reviews, and presenting one's research findings in a public forum. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisite: HIS337 Research and Writing of History I.

HIS397. Internship. 1 hour. Sp.
A professional field experience that will provide students experience in teaching or working in public history.

HIS 410. Christianity in the West. 3 hours. Sp., Even years.
A survey of Christianity's historical development in Europe and the Americas from the close of the medieval period through modern day. Emphasis will be given to the impact of the Reformations in Europe, Christianity's role in American contact and colonialism, the social progression of Christianity in Latin America, and the interplay of Christianity and politics in United States history.

HIS 412. Western Political Thought. 3 hours. F., Odd years.
A study of western political thought. This course examines writings on politics and political economy from the Ancient Greeks to the Twenty-First Century.

HIS 415. Twentieth Century World. (W) 3 hours. Sp., Even years.
A study of the world in the 20th century. This course examines international relations in an age of increasing globalization.

HIS 423. The South. 3 hours. On demand.
Contributions of the southern United States to the growth of the country are studied. Special emphasis is given to the sectional nature of the American nation prior to the Civil War and the adjustments made following that war.

HIS 424. Twentieth Century America. (W) 3 hours. F., Even years.
Study of the political, intellectual, diplomatic, and social developments of the United States in the 20th Century. This course contains a significant writing component.

HIS 440. History Capstone. 1 hour. F., Sp.
A synthesis of the study of history. Students will analyze written material from previous history courses, develop a documentary film based on history course content, and complete an oral examination administered by history professors.

PHI 243. Introduction to Philosophy. (W) 3 hours. F.
Introductory principles and problems of philosophy. Consideration is given to various views of truth, nature, man, and values. This course includes a significant writing component.

PHI 245. History of Philosophy I. (W) 3 hours. Sp., Even years.
This course surveys the history of philosophy from the perspectives of representative philosophers in the ancient and medieval periods. Emphasis is given to analysis and to criticism. This course includes a significant writing component.

PHI 246. History of Philosophy II. (W) 3 hours. Sp., Odd years.
This course surveys the history of philosophy from the perspectives of representative philosophers in the modern and contemporary periods. Emphasis is given to analysis and to criticism. This course includes a significant writing component.

PHI 340. Logic. 3 hours. Sp., Odd years.
Introductory principles of correct thinking. Inductive and deductive methods of reasoning are studied and application is made to religious problems. Same as BIB 340.

PHI 344. Ethics. 3 hours. Sp., Even years.
A survey of biblical teaching concerning ethical conduct. Various systems of conduct which oppose biblical teaching are evaluated in light of the teachings of the Bible. Same as BIB 344.

PHI 345. Philosophy of Evolution and Creation. 3 hours. Su.
A study of arguments from the philosophy of science and the philosophy of religion. The origin of the universe and the presence of persons on earth. Both biblical and extra-biblical material will be emphasized.

POL 231. American Government I. 3 hours. F., Sp.
An introduction to American government. This course will examine the government of the United States, with discussion of the founding principles of the American republic, federalism, the powers of the three branches of federal government and the protections guaranteed by the Constitution. Attention will also be given to state governments in general and Tennessee government in particular.

POL 232. American Government II. 3 hours. Sp.
An introduction to American politics and public policy. This course will examine the actors and dynamics of American politics - voters, parties, interest groups, campaigns and elections - and policymaking in the United States, including an overview of major public policy issues in the 21st centuries. Attention will also be given to state politics and policy in general and Tennessee politics and policy in particular. Although not required, POL 231 American Government I or a strong background in American government is recommended for this course.

POL 251. Fundamentals of Political Geography. 3 hours. F., Sp.
An introduction to political geography. This course will explore how geography shapes our politics and how politics, in turn, shapes and has shaped the geography of the globe. Major topics include the origin, location, and evolution of states; the defining and drawing of political boundaries; territorial conflicts and disputes; the impact of boundaries on personal and cultural identity; centripetal and centrifugal forces that encourage the success or failure of political units; effects of colonialism; and geopolitics.

POL 320. Diversity in America. (W) 3 hours. F., Sp.
An examination of the social and cultural differences that are present in the American population. This course will examine cultures and subgroups in the American community in a historical, legal, and social context. This course contains a significant writing component. Same as HUM/HIS 320.

POL 324. American Political Biography. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of the lives, achievements and contributions of outstanding Americans to the political history of the country. Same HIS 324.

POL 335. International Relations. 3 hours. Sp., Odd years.
A survey of the major issues and trends in international relations. This course will examine theories of global politics, institutions of global governance and the important actors in international relations, including the nation-state, international organizations and transnational movements.

POL 337. Comparative Governments. 3 hours. Sp., Even years.
An introduction to the comparative study of world governments. The course will survey the concepts, theories and methods that characterize the study of comparative politics and examine the various governmental systems, institutions, political processes and behaviors.

POL 338. U.S.-Latin American Relations: Historical Perspectives. 3 hours. Sp., Even years.
Lecture class with guest speakers. The course will focus on the development of political, social, and economic relations between the United States and Latin America from the 18th century to the present. Same as SPA 338.

POL 339. Congress and the Legislative Process. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of the legislative branch of government. This course will examine the role, powers and processes of the American Congress, and the interaction of legislators with voters, political parties, interest groups and the other branches of government in public policy making.

POL 341. American Presidency. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of the office of President of the United States. This course will examine the role, powers and politics of the presidency, with attention to its development from 1787 to the present.

POL375. American Legal Tradition. (W) 3 hours. F., Odd years.
An introduction to law and the American legal system. This course will examine law, judges, the court system, the legal profession, legal reasonings, and the relationship of each to the larger political system, with particular emphasis on the Anglo-American legal tradition. Prerequisite: POL 231 American Government I.

POL 385. Fundamentals of Criminal Law. 3 hours. Sp., Odd years.
An examination of the nature, scope and purpose of criminal law. This course will examine legal vocabulary, criminal liability, classifications of crimes, elements of crimes and criminal defenses. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisite: CJU 210 Introduction to Criminal Justice System or permission of the instructor.

POL 389. American Civil Liberties. 3 hours. F., Even years.
A case study in American civil liberties. This course will examine the personal and political liberties guaranteed under the United States Constitution.

POL 435. Constitutional Law. (W) 3 hours. F., Odd years.
A case study in American constitutional law. This course will examine the constitutional basis of and limitations on governmental power and the role of the U.S. Supreme Court. This course contains a significant writing component.

HIS 299A/399A
American Revolutionary Era. 3 hours. Offered on sufficient demand. A study of the American Revolution and War of Independence. Attention is given to the political, social, economic, and military aspects of the period between 1763-1789.

HIS 299B/399B
History of the American West. 3 hours. Offered on sufficient demand. A study of the westward movement in America. The emphasis is on the economic, political, and cultural impact of the settlement of the Great Plains.

HIS 299C/399C
National Government. 3 hours. Offered on sufficient demand. An on-the-scenes look at the operation of the national government. The course is taught in Washington, D.C. and includes visits to offices of the branches of government and various historical sites. Same as POL 299G/399G.

HIS 299J/399J
Religion and Politics. 3 hours. Offered on sufficient demand. An examination of religion as a force in politics and of the state's use of religion for political purposes. This course will examine the relationship between politics and religion in America and around the world from an historical, cultural and legal perspective, including the separation of church and state in the U.S., the types and legitimacy of political activities by different groups and the impact of religion on public policy. This course contains a significant writing component. Same as POL 299C/399C.

HIS 299K/399K
Special Topics in History. 3 hours. Offered on sufficient demand. A study of an area of special interest in either World or American History. Topics may include selected historical periods, major historical movements, decisive events, biographical studies, or religious movements. May be repeated for up to 6 hours credit.

PHI 299A/399A
The Problem of Suffering. 3 hours. Offered on sufficient demand. A study of the question, "Why?" specifically, "Why does God allow evil, pain, and suffering to occur?" Special attention is directed to (1) The atheist's attempt to disprove the existence of God on the basis of evil and pain, (2) Bible insights for believers, and (3) Suggestions for coping with suffering. Same as BIB 299E/399E.

POL 299C/399C
Religion and Politics. 3 hours. Offered on sufficient demand. An examination of religion as a force in politics and of the state's use of religion for political purposes. This course will examine the relationship between politics and religion in America and around the world from an historical, cultural and legal perspective, including the separation of church and state in the U.S., the types and legitimacy of political activities by different groups and the impact of religion on public policy. This course contains a significant writing component. Same as HIS 299J/399J.

POL 299F/399F
Special Topics in Political Studies. 3 hours. Offered on sufficient demand. An in-depth study of an area of special interest relating to political science, government or law. Topics may include selected political theories, areas of public policy, issues in constitutional law, state government and politics, foreign governments or regional politics. This course may be repeated for up to 6 hours credit.

POL 299G/399G
National Government. 3 hours. Offered on sufficient demand. An on-the-scenes look at the operation of the national government. This course is taught in Washington, D.C. and includes visits to offices of the branches of government and various historical sites. Same as HIS 299C/399C.