Course Descriptions

Communication

COM 140. Speech Communication. 3 hours. Su., F., Sp.

An introduction to the basic concepts of human communication theory with instruction and practice in interpersonal communication, small group communication, and public speaking.

COM 236. Intercultural Communication. 3 hours. Sp.

A study of the dynamics of communication across cultural boundaries. Special emphasis will be given to missiological applications. Topics to be considered will include: understanding culture, contextualization, preparing culturally appropriate lessons, effective use of translators, and principles for language learning. Prerequisite: COM 140 Speech Communication. Same as BIB 236.

COM 240. Public Speaking. 3 hours. Sp.

An introduction to the psychological and rhetorical bases of speech with practice in audience analysis, research, and the preparation and delivery of various types of speeches.

COM 241. Small Group Communication. 3 hours. F.

A theoretical and experiential introduction to the principles of effective group communication. Topics stressed include types of decision-making procedures, approaches to group leadership, specific group-related communication skills, and creativity in group problem-solving.

COM 243. Interpersonal Communication. 3 hours. Sp.

An experiential workshop designed to develop specific interpersonal skills essential to effectiveness in social interaction, teaching, counseling, business transactions, and family life. Students will work together in small groups as they respond to films and idea papers and participate in structured experiences.

COM 341. Mass Media Research Methods. (W) 3 hours. F.

An introduction to experimental and descriptive research methods in communication. Emphasis is given to understanding and critically analyzing research designs in various contexts of communication. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisites: COM 140 Speech Communication and COM 241 Small Group Communication.

COM 345. Persuasion. (W) 3 hours. F. Even years.

A study of current persuasion theory with emphasis on the application of the theory in a variety of specific contexts. Attention is paid also to the ethics of persuasion.

COM 347. Organizational Communication. 3 hours. F.

Examination and exploration of applications of communication theories within the framework of an organization. Attention will be given to strategies for diagnosing communication problems and effecting change in communication behaviors.

COM 349. Study of Public Discourse. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

Students are introduced to methods of analysis and criticism as they apply to various forms of public messages. A number of different forms of communication will be studied including speeches, radio and TV programs, and movies.

COM 442. Communication Theories. 3 hours.

A study of research-based theories of human communication. Students are assisted in making practical application of the concepts presented. This course contains a significant writing component.

Electronic Media

COM 150. Media History. 3 hours. Sp.

A history of radio and television broadcasting from the early 1900s to present day. Areas of study will include early pioneers and inventors, performers, producers, and programs from radio and television's Golden Ages. Also included will be discussions on the media's influence upon the public and how it changes and shapes their lives.

COM 151. Radio Station Operations. 1 hour. F., Sp.

A history of the development of various mass media from infancy to the rapid convergence of contemporary media. Areas of study will include early pioneers and inventors, performers, producers, and programs from various media. The course will provide a foundation for understanding current practices in mass media as well as future developments.

COM 252. Radio Productuction and Copywriting. (W) 3 hours. F.

Writing and production of various types of programs. Laboratory work is required. This course contains a significant writing component.

COM 253. Video Production Fundamentals. 3 hours. Sp.

Examination of the procedures and techniques of producing television programs. Special emphasis is given to field-based video production including camera work, audio recording, and non-linear video editing concepts and techniques. Laboratory work is required.

COM 356. Communication Law. (W) 3 hours. F.

A seminar course dealing with various landmark legal decisions that affect professionals working with communications media. Cases in freedom of speech, libel, privacy, copyright, Internet regulations, obscenity, and other pertinent areas will be studied. This course contains a significant writing component.

COM 358. Social Media. 3 hours. Sp.

An introduction to the use of varying types of social media with emphasis placed on how social media is changing the world and how that media can be used to enhance the quality of life.

Homiletics

COM 231. Preparation and Delivery Of Sermons. 3 hours. F., Sp.

Introduction to principles and techniques of preparing and delivering sermons. Logical outlining and effective presentation of various types of sermons are emphasized. Prerequisites: COM 140 Speech Communication. Same as BIB 231.

COM 335. History of Preaching. 3 hours. F. Odd years.

A study of the outstanding preachers in the history of Christianity. The course will consist of an examination of their lives, sermons, and methods of preparation, as well as delivery. Same as BIB 335.

COM 336. Electronic Media Evangelism. 3 hours. Sp. Even years.

This class will explore the use of radio, television, and the internet to teach the Word of God. Students will be trained in delivering sermons and devotional messages through these media outlets and will write and deliver several lessons during the course of the study. The class will include hands-on work in radio and television production studios. Same as BIB 336.

COM 435. Expository Preaching. 3 hours. Sp.

An examination of the expository method. Emphasis is placed on preaching from the Bible text; opportunity is given for practice, evaluation, and correction. Prerequisites: BIB/COM 231 Preparation and Delivery of Sermons and BIB 330 Preacher and His Work; or permission of department chairman. Same as BIB 435 and BIB 529.

PUBLIC RELATIONS

Public Relations

COM 296. Field Laboratory. 0 hours. Su., F., Sp.

Under supervision of an appropriate faculty member and with approval of the department chairman, the student will develop and implement a proposal for a field laboratory working with one of the campus student media (Radio station, TV studio, or student newspaper) or an off-campus media. The project should involve at least 40 hours of practical application of communication concepts. Successful completion of a field laboratory is a prerequisite to COM 497.

COM 383. Public Relations. (W) 3 hours. F.

A study of the principles, history, and practice of public relations in business, educational institutions, social welfare organizations, and government. Topics included are the processes of influencing public opinion, analysis of public relations programs, the responsibilities of public relations practitioners to their clients, to the media, and to the public. This course contains a significant writing component.

COM 385. Public Relations Methods. (W) 3 hours. Sp.

A study of the design and production of specialized forms of communication. Attention is given to audience analysis, message content and design, and basic design principles for various media channels. Prerequisite: COM 383 Public Relations.

COM 483. Public Relations Case Studies. (W) 3 hours. Sp.

A study of typical public relations problems in industry, labor, education, government, social welfare agencies, and trade associations. A case studies approach is used to foster insight into alternative approaches to strategic public relations planning. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisite: COM 383 Public Relations and COM 385 Public Relations Methods.

COM 489. Senior Seminar. 1 hour. F.

A capstone course to prepare students for entry into the communication field. Students will complete portfolios, develop a resume, and compose application letters. Guest speakers from the campus and community will be used. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

COM 496. Field Laboratory. 0 hours. Su., F., Sp.

Under supervision of an appropriate faculty member and with approval of the department chairman, the student will develop and implement a proposal for a field laboratory working with one of the campus student media (Radio station, TV studio, or student newspaper) or an off-campus media. The project should involve at least 40 hours of practical application of communication concepts. Successful completion of a field laboratory is a prerequisite to COM 497.

English

ENG 030. Basic English (Institut Credit Only). 3 hours. F., Sp.

Designed to teach basic language use, writing mechanics, and the principles of elementary composition. The fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure will be stressed. Teaching will focus on the writing process, moving from construction of logical sentences that are mechanically correct, to organization of sentences into simple paragraphs, to organization of paragraphs into an essay. This course is for institutional credit only and does not satisfy the general education English requirement (See Developmental Studies). This course does not count towards hours needed for graduation. A grade of "C" or higher must be obtained before student can continue on to ENG 101 English Composition I. Prerequisite: Below 18 in English on ACT or placement by the secondary placement exam in the course.

ENG 101. English Composition I. 3 hours. F., Sp.

An introduction to college writing. Students draft and revise essays written ina variety of rhetorical modes. Prerequisite: Required proficiency score on the English portion of the ACT or ACCUPLACER or ENG 030 Basic English with a minimum grade of "C."

ENG 102. English Composition II. 3 hours. F., Sp.

An introduction to research and argumentative writing. Students write research papers, critical essays, and argumentative essays using MLA style. Prerequisite: ENG 101 English Composition I or the equivalent.

ENG 225. English Literature I. 3 hours. F.

A survey of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Eighteenth Century. This course exposes students to a wide range of writers, periods, literary movements, and currents of thought in early English literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 226. English Literature II. 3 hours. Sp.

A survey of English literature from the Romantic period to the present. This course exposes students to a wide range of writers, periods, literary movements, and currents of thought in later English literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 235. American Literature I. 3 hours. Sp.

A survey of American literature from the colonial period to the Civil War. This course exposes students to a wide range of writers, periods, literary movements, and currents of thought in early American literature. Prerequisites: ENG 102 English Composition II or equivalent.

ENG 236. American Literature II. 3 hours. Sp.

A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present. This course exposes students to a wide range of writers, periods, literary movements, and currents of thought in later American literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 245. World Literature I. 3 hours. F.

A survey of world literature from ancient times through the 16th century. This course exposes students to a wide range of writers, periods, and currents of thought in world literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 246. World Literature II. 3 hours. Sp.

A survey of western literature, excluding British and American works, from the 17th century to the present. This course exposes students to a wide range of writers, periods, literary movements, and currents of thought in modern western literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 295. Introduction to English Studies. (W) 2 hours. Sp.

An introduction to English as a major. This course focuses on critical reading and interpretation of literary texts, research techniques in English studies, and careers for majors. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 305. Advanced Traditional Grammar. 3 hours. F.

A detailed study of the grammatical features of standard written English. This course includes analysis of traditional and structural grammar. Prerequisite: ENG 102 Englsih Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 310. Creative Writing. (W) 3 hours. F. Even years.

An introduction to the mechanics and concepts of short stoy and poetry writing. Emphasis is given to the structure of the short story: story ideas, characters, dialog, scene, plot, conflict, and the story's opening, middle, and ending. Depending on student interest, attention may be given to script, play, and screenwriting. Students participate in extensive journaling, peer critique, and revision. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 315. Rhetorical Grammar. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

An exploration of methods of incorporating the concepts learned in ENG 305 into student writing. This course is applicable for students interested in either creative or scholarly writing. Prerequisite: ENG 305 Advanced Traditional Grammar.

ENG 325. Legend of King Arthur. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

An examination of the King Arthur story. This course includes historical evidence and literary texts showing the development of Arthurian themes. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent

ENG 335. Romantic Poetry and Prose. (W) 3 hours. F. Odd years.

A study of the Romantic period of British literature. Writers studied may include Blake, Burns, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Lamb, and Hazlitt. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 340. Argumentation. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

A study of the principles of practical argumentation. This course emphasizes diagramming, evaluating, and identifying the various types and components of argument and recognizing fallacies. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 345. Women Writers. (W) 3 hours. F. Odd years.

An exploration of the traditions in women's literature and women as writers in English. This course combines textual analysis, cultural and literary theory, and student-led discussions. The course covers works by writers in various countries, but emphasis is placed on American cultures, including 19th century domestic culture, African-American culture, and/or Native American culture. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisites: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 355. Medieval English Poetry and Prose. 3 hours. F. On sufficient demand.

A study of Old and Middle English literature. This course concentrates on Langland, Chaucer, Old and Middle English lyrics, religious writers, and Malory. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 365. Renaissance Drama. (W) 3 hours. Sp.

A study of representative dramas of Renaissance England. Students read plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Writers studies may include Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Middleton. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 375. History and Structure of English. 3 hours. Sp.

A review of the development of the English language, tracing changes in English over time. This course also includes study of the components of contemporary standard English, such as phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, as well as language universals and varieties of English. Prerequisite: ENG 305 Advanced Traditional Grammar.

ENG 385. Victorian Poetry and Prose. 3 hours. F. Odd years.

A study of the Victorian period of British literature. Writers studied may include Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Carlyle, Newman, and Mill. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 395. Literary Theory. 3 hours. F.

Examination of theory as it applies to our understanding of texts. Critical attention is focused mainly on literature, but attention s also given to non-literary representations of culture. The course also examines the value of literary studies as an academic discipline.Prerequisite: ENG 295 Introduction to English Studies.

ENG 405. Advanced Composition. (W) 3 hours. Sp.

An overview of the craft of non-fiction, academic, and professional writing. Students participate in extensive journaling, drafting, peer critique, and deep revision. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisites: ENG 295 Introduction to English Studies and ENG 305 Advanced Traditional Grammar.

ENG 425. The British Novel. 3 hours. Sp. Even years.

A study of the important British novels from the beginning through modern times. Writers studied may include Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Austen, Dickens, Trollope, and Conrad. Prerequisite: ENG 295 Introduction to English Studies.

ENG 435. American Fiction. (W) 3 hours. F. Even years.

A study of the short story and the novel in America. Writers studied may include Brockden Brown, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Chopin, Cather, Hemmingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and Hurston. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisite: ENG 295 Introduction to English Studies.

ENG 495. Senior Project. 1 hour. F.

Capstone course for English majors. Students will produce individual research projects guided by an English faculty member. The class will meet to discuss research methods, topic exploration, progress, and peer revision. Students will meet individually with the instructor. Upon completion of the project, the students will make an oral presentation of the research findings and submit a portfolio of representative writing in English. Prerequisite: Senior standing as an English major.

Foreign Languages

SPA 131. Elementary Spanish I. 3 hours. F., Sp.

Beginning Spanish, stressing oral and written communication skills. Students learn basic grammar and information about cultures in Spanish-speaking countries. Four class periods per week.

SPA 132. Elementary Spanish II. 3 hours. F., Sp.

Contiuation of SPA 131 Elementary Spanish I. Four class periods per week. Prerequisite: SPA 131 Elementary Spanish I or the equivalent.

SPA 231. Intermediate Spanish I. 3 hours. F., Sp.

A review and expansion of grammar taught in Elementary Spanish I and II, with continued emphasis on oral and written skills. Particular attention is given to problematic sentence constructions, verb tenses, and moods. Prerequisite: SPA 132 Elementary Spanish II or the equivalent.

SPA 232. Intermediate Spanish II. 3 hours. F., Sp.

Continuation of SPA 231 Intermediate Spanish I. Prerequisite: SPA 231 Intermediate Spanish I or equivalent.

SPA 271. Intro to Latin American & Peninsular Lit. 3 hours. F.

Designed to prepare the student to read, understand, and analyze literature in Spanish before taking higher-level literature courses in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPA 231 Intermediate Spanish I or permission from the instructor. Course can also be taken concurrently with SPA 232 Intermediate Spanish II with instructor's approval.

SPA 296. Field Laboratory. 1 hour. Su.

Provides opportunities for hands-on learning experiences among Spanish-speakers. Students must work with FHU Spanish instructors as well as a field supervisor to plan objectives, activities, and evaluative criteria. A minimum of 40 hours of field activity is required for one credit hour.

SPA 331. Survey of Peninsular Literature I. (W) 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

A survey of the literature of Spain from the Middle Ages through the 17th century. Prerequisite: SPA 232 Intermediate Spanish II, or the equivalent, or permission from the instructor. SPA 337 Advanced Spanish Grammar I is also recommended.

SPA 332. Survey of Peninsular Literature II. (W) 3 hours. Sp. Even years.

A survey of the literature of Spain from the beginning of the 18th century to the present. Prerequisites: SPA 232 Intermediate Spanish II, or the equivalent, or permission from the instructor.

SPA 336. Spanish Conversation. 3 hours. Sp.

A course that provides opportunities for discussions and debates in Spanish on a wide range of practical topics. Prerequisite: SPA 231 Intermediate Spanish I, or equivalent, or permission from the instructor.

SPA 365. Latin American Civilization and Cultures. (W) 3 hours. F.

A brief overview of pre-Columbian civilization, European colonization, struggles for independence, and national building that have evolved into present-day Latin America. The course encompasses the disciplines of sociology, archaeology, anthropology, politics, history, philosophy, and religion in order to better understand Latin American cultures. Prerequisite: SPA 232 Intermediate Spanish II, or the equivalent, or permission from the instructor.

SPA 366. Peninsular Civilizations and Cultures. 3 hours. Sp.

Survey of the history of Spain from its earliest inhabitants to the present. Particular focus will be given to the Reconquest of the Iberian Peninsula, the Spanish colonization of the New World, the Spanish Civil War, and the dictatorship of Francisco Franco. Prerequisite: SPA 232 Intermediate Spanish II, or the equivalent, or permission from the instructor. SPA 336 Spanish Conversation is also recommended.

SPA 367. Spanish Immersion Program/Study Abroad. 1 hour. Su. Even years.

Open to Spanish minors, majors, and others interested in the Spanish language and culture. An opportunity to study with native speakers in a Spanih-speaking country for a minimum of four weeks. Students pursuing a Spanish minor or major will attend Spanish classes daily, as well as take numerous cultural and historical excursions. Additional credit hours will be awarded according to courses taken in the host country. Students will not be billed the comprehensive charge for the summer term but are required to pay program expenses; institutional scholarships and discounts do not apply. Prerequisites: Student must have permission of the Spanish Program Coordinator to participate and meet other requirements specified in the undergraduate catalog for FHU Abroad.

SPA 431. Survey of Latin American Literature I. 3 hours. Sp.

A survey of Latin American literature from the time of the European conquest through the 18th century. Prerequisites: SPA 232 Intermediate Spanish II and SPA 271 Introduction to Latin American and Peninsular Literature, or the equivalents, or permission from the instructor.

SPA 432. Survey of Latin American Literature II. 3 hours. F. Even years.

A survey of Latin American literature from the beginning of the 19th century to the present. Prerequisites: SPA 232 Intermediate Spanish II and SPA 271 Introduction to Latin American and Peninsular Literature, or the equivalents, or permission from the instructor.

SPA 466. Women Latin American Literature/Culture. 3 hours. F. Odd years.

An overview of the literary and cultural contributions of Latin American women from the colonial era to the present. Prerequisite: SPA 232 Intermediate Spanish II, or the equivalent, or permission from the instructor.

SPA 467. Hispanic Film Studies. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

Study of various aspects of Latin American and Peninsular culture, history, and civilization through the medium of film. Emphasis will be given to the expansion of a working vocabulary in the target language, both in oral and written formats, as well as listening comprehension and reading skills. Prerequisites: SPA 232 Intermediate Spanish II, or the equivalent, or permission from the instructor.

SPA 490. Capstone Peninsular/Latin American Study. 1 hour. F., Sp.

Advanced Spanish study required of all Spanish majors during their final semester of coursework for the degree. Students will be required to give a presentation and write a research paper based on work done in a 300- or 400-level class. Prerequisite: Completion of one 400-level course.

Placement:

Students may achieve advanced placement in Intermediate Spanish courses by taking the CLEP exam and earning scores sufficient to receive credit for prerequisite courses. Passing the CLEP for Spanish qualifies the student for the corresponding intermediate course. Students may also be placed in Intermediate Spanish based on dual-enrollment credit or AP credit that meets prerequisite requirements of the course. Students who have lived in Spanish-speaking countries may also be placed in intermediate level language courses.


Journalism

JOU 270. Introduction to Photography. 3 hours. F., Sp.

An introduction to the photographic process, which includes a functional understanding of the manual single lens reflex (SLR), 35mm camera, 55mm normal lens, and the processing of light-sensitive materials (shooting, developing, and printing of 35mm film). Requisite: Access to a manual single lens reflex, 35mm camera, 50mm normal lens. Same as ART 270.

JOU 274. Basic Media Writing. (W) 3 hours. F.

A theoretical and practical introduction to gathering, interpreting, and reporting news in both the print and electronic media. Laboratory work is required. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisites: ENG101 and ENG102 English Composition I and II.

JOU 353. Multimedia Narrative and Journalism. 3 hours. F.

Media products produced for both narrative expression and journalistic objectives. This course investigates professional communication through the integration of writing, audio, and video. Laboratory work required.

JOU 374. Advanced Media Writing. (W) 3 hours. Sp.

An analysis of contemporary issues in journalism with special emphasis given to in-depth reporting. Laboratory work required. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisite: JOU 274 Basic Reporting.

JOU 474. Feature/Editorial Writing. (W) 3 hours. Sp. Even years.

A theoretical and practical application of basic journalism principles to the specialized areas of feature writing and editorial writing. Laboratory work is required. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisites: JOU 274 Basic Reporting and JOU 374 Advanced Reporting.

JOU 475. Editing for Publication. 3 hours. Sp. Odd years.

A practical application of accepted editing procedures and use of AP Style. Application to various print media is addressed. Laboratory work is required.

Topical Seminars

COM 299A. Advanced Public Speaking. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

A study of different forms of public speaking with emphasis on skill development in persuasive speaking in various contexts such as parliamentary debate, cross-examination style debate, and audience participation formats. Prerequisites: COM 140 Speech Communication and either COM 240 Public Speaking or COM 231 Preparation and Delivery of Sermons or permission from the instructor.

COM 299C. Nonverbal Communication. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

An experience-based workshop stressing the significance and function of nonverbal messages in interpersonal communication. Such nonverbal cues as space and distance, body language, time, touch, environmental influcence, silence, and physical characteristics will be examined.

COM 299E. Transactional Analysis. 3 hours.

An experiential workshop that explores the concepts of transactional analysis. Students will learn to analyze their transactions with others in terms of the three ego states, the four life positions, time structuring, and "game" playing.

COM 399C. Nonverbal Communication. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

An experience-based workshop stressing the significance and function of nonverbal messages in interpersonal communication. Such nonverbal cues as space and distance, body language, time, touch, environmental influcence, silence, and physical characteristics will be examined.

COM 399E. Transactional Analysis. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

An experiential workshop which explores the concepts of transactional analysis. Students will learn to analyze their transactions with others in terms of the three ego states, the four life positions, time structuring, and "game" playing.

COM 399I. Special Topics in Communication. (W) 3 hours. F.

A study of selected topics impacting the field of communications today. Topics may include media literacy, media effects, entertainment education strategy, critical and cultural studies, and history of communication. This course contains a significant writing component. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of credit.

ENG 299G. Special Topics Language/Literature. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

An in-depth study of an area of special interest relating to the English language or literature. Recent topics have included American dialects, Utopian writings, contemporary literature, African American literature, and Literary London. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 299H. Canada Theatre Survey. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

A study of selected European and American plays and productions of these plays, with a special emphasis on Shakespeare and George Bernard Shaw. This course also introduces students to professional theatre in Canada, focusing on the Stratford Shakespeare Festival and Shaw Festival of Canada. The course includes a trip to the Stratford and Shaw festivals. The cost of the trip is in addition to tuition. Same as THE 299B/399B. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 399E. American Literature in the 1920s. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

A study of the literature and culture of the 1920's in America. This course incorporates interdisciplinary resources to expore American fiction, poetry and drama of the period. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 399G. Special Topics Language/Literature. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

An in-depth study of an area of special interst relating to the English language or literature. Recent topics have included American dialects, Utopian writings, contemporary literature, African-American literature, and Literary London. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

ENG 399H. Canada Theatre Survey. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

A study of selected European and American plays and productions of these plays, with a special emphasis on Shakespeare and George Bernard Shaw. This course also introduces students to professional theatre in Canada, focusing on the Stratford Shakespeare Festival and Shaw Festival of Canada. The course includes a trip to the Stratford and Shaw festivals. The cost of the trip is in addition to tuition. Same as THE 299B/399B. Prerequisite: ENG 102 English Composition II or the equivalent.

SPA 299A. Special Topics in Spanish. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

An in-depth study of special topics related to the Spanish language and/or Spanish-speaking cultures.

SPA 399A. Special Topics in Spanish. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

Lecture and research on language, literature, culture, and other relevant topics.

SPA 499A. Special Topics in Spanish. 3 hours. On sufficient demand.

Lecture and research on language, literature, culture, and other relevant topics.