Course Descriptions

ANT201. General Anthropology. 3 hours. On demand.
An overview of anthropology which includes the four major subdivisions of anthropology: archeology, physical anthropology, linguistics, and social anthropology.

ANT202. Cultural Anthropology. 3 hours. On demand.
The comparative study of culture: social organization, economics, government, education, religion, language, and arts in primitive modern societies.

ANT431. Missionary Anthropology. 3 hours. Sp., Odd years.
An examination of basic anthropological insights applied to the missionary enterprise. Culture change and cross-cultural adaptation will be addressed, as well as world view, urbanization, modernization, and westernization of less developed cultures. Same as BIB 431 and BIB550.

CJU210. Introduction to Criminal Justice System. 3 hours. F.
An intensive examination of the philosophical and historical backgrounds, agencies and processes, purposes and functions, administration, and career orientations of our criminal justice system.

CJU310. Police and Law Enforcement. 3 hours. Sp.
An examination of the role and function of police and law enforcement systems in the U.S. society: range and limitations imposed on law enforcement, police discretion, law enforcement policies and procedures, accountability, criminal justice ethics, and police-community relations. Prerequisite: CJU 210 Introduction to Criminal Justice System.

CJU320. Criminal Investigation. 3 hours. F.
A survey of the fundamental techniques of criminal investigation. Students will be exposed to the history of criminal investigation and criminalistics, interviewing and interrogation, physical evidence, crime scene procedures, crime analysis, investigation techniques, report writing, case preparation and courtroom testimony. Prerequisite: CJU 210 Introduction to Criminal Justice System.

CJU328. Computer Forensics. 3 hours. F., Even years.
An introductory study of the field of Computer Forensics with emphasis on the necessary skills needed to collect, preserve and analyze digital data. This class will explore the forensic process and the most common forensic tools used along with their capabilities. Experience will be gained by incorporating case studies and real world experience into this process. Discussion will focus on the recovery process while understanding the evidentiary value of such. Prerequisite: BUS 253 Business Computer Applications or CIS 161 Computer Applications. Same as MIS 328.

CJU330. Correctional Systems (Management). 3 hours. F.
A comprehensive overview of management issues in both individual and community corrections. Topics included are: organizational theory, planning, programming and budgeting, policy analysis, program evaluation, and information systems and technology, along with facilities management, offender classification systems, treatment programs, management of special offender populations, and personnel issues. Prerequisite: CJU 210 Introduction to Criminal Justice System.

CJU336. Fraud Examination. 3 hours. Sp.
An introductory study of how and why fraud is committed, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, and how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved. Prerequisites: ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I and ACC 233 Principles of Accounting II OR ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I and FIN/FAM 388 Personal and Family Financial Planning. Same as ACC/BUS 336.

CJU410. Criminal Justice Theories. (W) 3 hours. F.
An examination and explanation of the major theories of criminal deviance. Emphasis is placed on past and current theories of crime including sociological, economic, psychological and biological theories of crime causation. The theories will be examined in light of criminal justice data. This course includes a significant writing component. Prerequisite: CJU 320 Criminal Investigation.

CJU497. Internship. 3 hours. Sp.
A professional field experience under the supervision of an experienced professional, carefully selected and approved by the student's advisor. Prerequisite: CJU 410 Criminal Justice Theories.

CJU499A. Special Topics in Criminal Justice. 3 hours. Sp.
An in-depth study of an area of special interest relating to the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CJU410 Criminal Justice Theories.

FAM201. Child Development. 3 hours. F., Sp.
A holistic study of the typical and atypical development of a child from prenatal stage to school-age. Emphasis is on the ways fundamental needs of young children may be met in daily living. Directed observation and participation in a local preschool. Two hours lecture and two hours observation and participation. Same as PSY 201.

FAM230. Marriage and the Family. 3 hours. Su., F., Sp.
An introduction to the basic principles that are needed in creating a happy and successful marriage and family life. A biblical perspective is used to consider such topics as sex roles, dating, marriageability, mixed marriages, engagement, sex adjustment, in-law adjustment, financial adjustment, life insurance, divorce, reproduction, family planning, and child rearing. Same as BIB/SOC 230.

FAM299B/399B. Death and Dying. 3 hours. F.
A critique of death and dying in contemporary North America. Themes include the death system, care of the dying and bereaved, attachment theory, normal and complicated grief, factors influencing the grief reaction, funerals, children and death, suicide, and ethical issues faced by service providers.

FAM305. Childhood Disorders. 3 hours. F.
An overview of major socio-psychological childhood disorders. This course is designed to assist students, early and later childhood educators, parents, and medical and state agency employees in the recognition and understanding of such conditions in children.

FAM310. Developmental Psychology. 3 hours. Su., F., Sp.
A study of the physical, mental, emotional, and social development of an individual from conception to death. More emphasis will be given to development through early adulthood. It is recommended that General Psychology be taken prior to this course. Same as PSY 310.

FAM320. Expressive Therapies. 3 hours. F., Sp.
A study of the integration of the creative arts with traditional therapeutic approaches. The course emphasizes art, music, play, movement, and bibliotherapeutic techniques. Same as SWK320.

FAM331. Parenting and Family Relations. (W) 3 hours. Sp.
An in-depth study of parent/child relationships and their application to the rearing of children. Emphasis is on the principles and practices parents can apply to promote understanding and skills that benefit all family members in their unique growth and development. This course includes a significant writing component.

FAM335. Human Sexuality. 3 hours. Sp.
A survey of the complex social, psychological, and spiritual aspects of human sexuality. Emphasis will be on a responsible view of sexuality as a part of life adjustment. Same as HEA 335.

FAM345. Child Management Through Adolescence. 3 hours. Sp.
An examination of child management and parenting practices. The meaning and use of child management will be discussed in relation to the theoretical and practical aspects. Same as SWK 345.

FAM355. Family Policies. (W) 3 hours. Sp.
An analysis of government programs and policies that impact upon the family including, but not limited to: childcare, aging, family law, healthcare, housing, mental health, family violence, and income maintenance. Particular emphasis will be placed on understanding the underlying agendas and constructs that go into play in shaping public policy in the arena. This course includes a significant writing component.

FAM365. Family Life Education Methodology. 3 hours. F.
A study of the general philosophy and broad principles of family life education in conjunction with the ability to plan, implement, and evaluate such educational experiences.

FAM388. Personal and Family Financial Planning. 3 hours. Su., F., Sp.
A detailed study of personal and family finance. This course includes biblical teaching, financial planning, budgeting, banking, savings, credit, housing, insurance, investments, tax planning, teaching financial responsibility to children, gifts, retirement and estate planning. Same as FIN 388.

FAM408. Family and Individual Counseling. 3 hours. F.
A study of principles, techniques, and procedures employed in personal and family counseling. Same as PSY 408.

FAM431. Administration of Child and Family Programs. 3 hours. F.
A study of the various career opportunities in the field of child development and family studies as well as the educational and/or certification requirements to fill these positions. Consideration will also be given to the standards, ethics, and practices that will assure quality day care to clients of any age.

FCS121. Principles of Nutrition. 3 hours. F., Sp.
A study of nutrition, incorporating the fundamental scientific principles to the science of nutrition. Students examine concepts and controversies to develop their own nutritional lifestyle compatible with the principles of sound nutrition. Same as HEA 121.

FCS122. Food Preparation. 3 hours. F.
A study of the fundamentals of food preparation and basic principles of food science. Emphasis is given to standard methods of food preparation including food quality and safety. Meets two times each week for lecture and labs.

FCS299A/399A. Stalking Wild Foods. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of the wild plants in this area suitable for food for man. Identification, habitat, collection, and preparation of these plants for food are studied. Field trips are included. Same as in BIO 299B/399B.

FCS320. Family Health. 3 hours. On demand.
A comprehensive study of the proper care of the health of the family from conception to death. Emphasis is given to health maintenance and disease prevention.

FCS322. Nutrition Throughout the Life Cycle. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of the nutritional needs of selected developmental stages such as reproduction, growth, and aging. Prerequisite: FCS/HEA 121 Principles of Nutrition.

FCS323. Community Nutrition. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of nutrition care and education in community settings. Includes program planning, implementation, evaluation of nutrition services and field experience. Prerequisite: FCS/HEA 121 Principles of Nutrition.

FCS420. Household and Institutional Equipment. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of large and small household and institutional equipment, with special emphasis given to the kitchen and laundry room.

FCS424. Diet and Disease. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of the relationship of diet to health and disease. Emphasis will be given to the treatment of disease through diet. Prerequisite: FCS/HEA 121 Principles of Nutrition.

PSY201. Child Development. 3 hours. F., Sp.
A holistic study of the typical and atypical development of a child from prenatal stage to school-age. Emphasis is on the ways fundamental needs of young children may be met in daily living. Directed observation and participation in a local preschool. Two hours lecture and two hours observation and participation. Same as FAM 201.

PSY210. General Psychology. 3 hours. F., Sp.
An introduction to the science of psychology. This course prepares students for further study in the science of human behavior and mental processes.

PSY215. Introduction to Psychological Practice. (W) 1 hour. F.
An introduction to the various specialty areas of psychology practice and psychological research. Emphasis is also given to the basic element of writing in APA style. Prerequisite: PSY 210 General Psychology.

PSY218. Abnormal Psychology. 3 hours. F., Sp.
A study of the major areas of behavior disorder with discussion of suggested causes and types of therapy. Prerequisite: PSY 210 General Psychology.

PSY299E/399E. Parapsychology. 3 hours. On demand.
An exploration of parapsychological phenomena. The study will include extrasensory perception, psychics, astrology, and other topics in parapsychology. An analysis of scientifically-based evidence offered to support parapsychological claims.

PSY299G/399G. Stress-Uses and Abuses. 3 hours. Su.
The examination of the causes and effects of stress on the body. Different physical and mental methods to cope with unhealthy stress will be demonstrated. Diet and its effect on stress will be discussed. Same as SWK 299A/399A and SOC 299A/399A.

PSY299H/399H. Psychology in Film. 3 hours. On demand.
An examination of the representation of psychology in film, television, and the media, including psychopathology and its treatment. Attention will be given to the impact of media on society’s perception of mental illness. Students will be expected to explore their own beliefs about mental illness through writing and discussion. Prerequisite: PSY 210 General Psychology is recommended.

PSY306. Educational Psychology. (W) 3 hours. F., Sp.
An examination of theories of learning, different kinds of learning, and strategies for the achievement of objectives. Requires clinical observations. This course includes a significant writing component.

PSY310. Developmental Psychology. 3 hours. Su., F., Sp.
A study of the physical, mental, emotional, and social development of an individual from conception to death. More emphasis will be given to development through early adulthood. It is recommended that General Psychology be taken prior to this course. Same as FAM 310.

PSY311. Research Methods. (W) 3 hours. Sp.
A study of basic experimental research design in psychology. This course includes a significant writing component.

PSY312. Social Psychology. 3 hours. F.
A study of the psychology of the individual related to the development of social behavior. Emphasis is placed upon personality development and the interaction between the individual and the group. Prerequisites: PSY 210 General Psychology or SOC 241 General Sociology.

PSY315. Learning and Memory. 3 hours. Sp.
A study of how the applications and findings of experimental psychology are related to the learning situation. Prerequisites: PSY 210 General Psychology and three additional hours of psychology courses.

PSY316. Data Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences. 3 hours. F.
A study of the basic principles of data analysis and statistics as applied to the Behavioral Sciences. The conceptual understanding of analysis and its relation to research design will be emphasized through the examination of psychological literature. Prerequisite: PSY311 Research Methods

PSY350. Forensic Psychology. 3 hours. Sp.
An exploration of the range of various forensic-related psychological theories involving crime and crime causation due to mental illness. It specifically addresses how psychologists impact research, practice and policies in criminal law and in the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: PSY 218 Abnormal Psychology.

PSY401. Advanced Child Development. (W) 3 hours. F., Even years.
A study of the child in his or her family, giving attention to special problems in child development and family relations. This course includes a significant writing component. Prerequisite: FAM/PSY 201 Child Development. Same as FAM 401.

PSY407. Organizational Psychology. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of the development of organizations and the psychological implications. This course also examines the reaction of individuals in various situations.

PSY408. Family and Individual Counseling. 3 hours. F., Sp.
Study of the principles, techniques, and procedures employed in personal and family counseling. Same as FAM 408.

PSY413. Psychological Assessment. (W) 3 hours. Sp.
A study of the theory, techniques, and characteristics of psychological assessment including various tests of human achievement, ability, aptitude, interests, and personality characteristics. It is highly recommended Data Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences be taken prior to this course. This course contains a significant writing component. Prerequisites: Nine hours of upper-division psychology.

PSY416. History of Psychology. (W) 3 hours. F.
A survey of the scientific and philosophical antecedents of modern psychology. This course includes a significant writing component. Prerequisites: nine hours of upper-division psychology.

PSY418. Psychological Psychology. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of the nervous system and other physiological correlates of behavior. Prerequisites: PSY 210 General Psychology and three additional hours of psychology courses.

PSY419. Psychology Review. 3 hours. Sp.
A study of the major areas of psychology with theoretical problems and their implications. Prerequisites: PSY 311 Research Methods, 90 hours, and a declared major in psychology.

SOC230. Marriage and the Family. 3 hours. Su., F., Sp.
An introduction to the basic principles that are needed in creating a happy and successful marriage and family life. A biblical perspective is used to consider such topics as sex roles, dating, marriageability, mixed marriages, engagement, sex adjustment, in-law adjustment, financial adjustment, life insurance, divorce, reproduction, family planning, and child rearing. Same as FAM/BIB 230.

SOC240. Crime and Delinquency. 3 hours. F.
A study of crime, causes, juvenile delinquency, court systems, correctional institutions, and parole and release systems.

SOC241. General Sociology. 3 hours. F., Sp.
An introduction to the general principles of sociology, giving a broad perspective of the nature of society and its problems in terms of social institutions, forces, and changes.

SOC242. Social Problems. 3 hours. On demand.
An examination of contemporary problems in modern society. Prerequisite: SOC 241 General Sociology.

SOC245. Social Gerontology. 3 hours. On demand.
An introduction to social and cultural aspects of aging in contemporary society. Demographics of an aging population and basic theories of aging will be introduced. Types of problems encountered by older adults will be discussed.

SOC251. Human Behavior in the Social Environment I: Childhood and Adolescence. 3 hours. F.
A study of a people-in-systems theoretical orientation for knowledge and understanding of human behavior in the social environment. The student will be introduced to a range of concepts which relate to human development and diversity within social systems from childhood to adolescence and which will be useful to the assessment of, and intervention with, people/system problems as they are encountered in social work practice. Same as SWK 251.

SOC252. Human Behavior in the Social Environment II: Adulthood and Aging. 3 hours. Sp.
An exploration of the processes of human development and changes from adulthood through aging. The student will analyze these developmental periods in terms of major intrapersonal, interpersonal, cultural, and societal systems. An emphasis is placed on policies, programs, and services for the aging. Same as SWK 252.

SOC299A/399A. Stress-Uses and Abuses. 3 hours. Su.
An examination of the causes and effects of stress on the body. Different physical and mental methods to cope with unhealthy stress will be demonstrated. Diet and its effect on stress will be discussed. Same as SWK 299A/399A and PSY 299G/399G.

SOC299B/399B. Sociology of Sport. 3 hours. On demand.
A study of the place of sport in American culture. Sport will be studied from the perspective of sociology. Same as KIN 299I/399I.

SOC405. Methods of Social and Behavioral Research I. 3 hours. F.
An introduction to research methodology as applied to social problems and human behavior. Emphasis is on problem formulation, development of research design, instrument construction, and basic sampling techniques. Same as SWK 405.

SOC406. Methods of Social and Behavioral Research II. (W) 3 hours. Sp.
A continuation of SOC 405. Emphasis on data collection, analysis, inferential statistics, and report writing. Prerequisite: SOC 405 Methods of Social and Behavioral Research I. This course includes a significant writing component. Same as SWK 406. Lab required.

SOC445. Ethnic Cultures. 3 hours. Su., F.
This is a study of the origin, nature, and diffusion of culture, giving attention to identity, goals, and social problems of subcultures. Prerequisite: SOC 241 General Sociology.

SWK150. Introduction to Social Work. 3 hours. F.
An introduction to the social work profession. This course provides for a survey of the field of social work with attention directed to social service programs and opportunities for social work practice.

SWK250. Social Work Practice I. 3 hours. Sp.
A study of generalist social work practice as a creative blending of values, knowledge, and skills. This course introduces the generalist intervention model for practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. This course emphasizes a theoretical and conceptual understanding of generalist social work practice. Prerequisite: SWK 150 Introduction to Social Work.

SWK251. Human Behavior in the Social Environment I: Childhood and Adolescence. 3 hours. F.
A study of a people-in-systems theoretical orientation for knowledge and understanding of human behavior in the social environment. The student will be introduced to a range of concepts which relate to human development and diversity within social systems from childhood to adolescence and which will be useful to the assessment of and intervention with people/system problems as they are encountered in social work practice. Same as SOC 251.

SWK252. Human Behavior in the Social Environment II: Adulthood and Aging. 3 hours. Sp.
An exploration of the processes of human development and changes from adulthood through aging. The student will analyze these developmental periods in terms of major intrapersonal, interpersonal, cultural, and societal systems. An emphasis is placed on policies, programs, and services for the aging. Prerequisite: SWK 251 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I: Childhood and Adolescence. Same as SOC 252.

SWK260. Careers in Social Work. 1 hour. Sp.
An overview of the multiple fields in social work practice. This course gives the beginning social work student an opportunity to be exposed to social work practice within a community agency. Professionals from diverse areas of practice will address students about their work, clientele served, and the values, knowledge, and skills required.

SWK265. Professional Communication in Social Work Practice. (W) 3 hours. Sp.
A study of oral and written communication in professional social work practice. This course emphasizes interviewing skills and the organization of written information. This course includes a significant writing component. Prerequisite: SWK 150 Introduction to Social Work. Corequisite: SWK250 Social Work Practice I.

SWK299A/399A. Stress-Uses and Abuses. 3 hours. Su.
An examination of the causes and effects of stress on the body. Different physical and mental methods to cope with unhealthy stress will be demonstrated. Diet and its effect on stress will be discussed. Same as SOC 299A/399A and PSY 299G/399G.

SWK299D/399D. Foster Child Care. 3 hours. On demand.
A course designed to provide useful skills, techniques, and insights for those interested in providing foster care or who are presently working in the field. Specific problem areas will be addressed: discipline, communication, sexual abuse, the birth family, school problems and other topics.

SWK320. Expressive Therapies. 3 hours. F., Sp.
A study of the integration of the creative arts with more traditional therapeutic approaches. The course emphasizes art, music, play, movement, and bibliotherapeutic techniques. Same as FAM320.

SWK330. Crisis Intervention. 3 hours. Sp.
An overview of crisis theory and appropriate interventions for responding to clients in crisis. Crisis interventions addressed include: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, suicide, sexual assault, domestic violence, violent behavior in the work place, terrorist attacks, and hostage crises.

SWK341. Child Welfare I. 3 hours. F.
An in-depth exposure to child welfare services in America. The historical development of this specialized area of social work will be explored, as well as the scope of services included under child welfare. Specific techniques used in working with children will be studied.

SWK342. Child Welfare II. 3 hours. Sp.
An exploration of generalist practice skills in child welfare. The course will introduce students to topics and strategies needed to organize, conduct, and maintain their social work practice in the public child welfare setting. Major topics in the course include: personal, professional, and societal response to children at risk; assessment of families with child welfare issues; and treatment strategies utilized with traumatized children.

SWK345. Child Management Through Adolescence. 3 hours. Sp.
An examination of child management and parenting practices. The meaning and use of child management will be discussed in relation to the theoretical and practical aspects. Same as FAM 345.

SWK351. Social Work Practice II. 3 hours. Su., F.
A study of social work processes and problem-solving skills as they create a generalist model for practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. This course emphasizes the needs and conditions of individuals and families within the environment and ways to remediate and/or prevent people-in-system problems using the processes of generalist practice: assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation, and termination. Prerequisites: SWK 150 Introduction to Social Work and SWK 250 Social Work Practice I.

SWK352. Social Work Practice III. 3 hours. Su., Sp.
A continued study of social work processes and problem-solving skills as they create a generalist model for practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. This course emphasizes the values, knowledge, and generalist skills necessary to work with groups, organizations, and communities to facilitate problem-solving and planned change. Prerequisite: SWK 150 Introduction to Social Work, SWK 250 Social Work Practice I, and SWK 351 Social Work Practice II.

SWK361. Social Welfare Policies and Services I. (W) 3 hours. F.
A study of social welfare policies and services both from historical and current perspectives. Attention is given to the relationship between societal values and philosophical approaches to social welfare policies and planning. This course includes a significant writing component.

SWK362. Social Welfare Policies and Services II. (W) 3 hours. Sp.
A presentation of frameworks for analyzing social welfare policies and a study of administration and management of social welfare programs from theoretical and practical perspectives. Attention is given to organizational structures and processes. Prerequisite: SWK 361 Social Welfare Policies and Services I.

SWK405. Methods of Social and Behavioral Research I. 3 hours. F.
An introduction of research methodology as applied to social problems and human behavior. Emphasis is on problem formulation, development of research design, instrument construction, and basic sampling techniques. Same as SOC 405.

SWK406. Methods of Social and Behavioral Research II. (W) 3 hours. Sp.
A continuation of SWK 405. Emphasis on data collection, analysis, inferential statistics, and report writing. Prerequisite: SWK 405 Methods of Social and Behavioral Research I. This course includes a significant writing component. Same as SOC 406. Lab required.

SWK450. Intervention with Populations-at-Risk. 3 hours. F.
An examination of social work assessment and intervention strategies which promote awareness and skill for working with variations among human beings, such as those suffering from physical, mental, economic, religious, or social problems. The course emphasizes a need for sensitivity to human diversity and strategies to promote social and economic justice for populations-at-risk of discrimination, oppression, or abuse. Prerequisites: SWK 250 Social Work Practice I, SWK 351 Social Work Practice II, SWK 352 Social Work Practice III.

SWK454. Seminar in Social Work Practice. 3 hours. Su., F., Sp.
A review of major course work and the current social work practice scene. Emphasis is placed on the student pursuing major career interests and on preparation for the senior Social Work Practicum. This course should be taken the semester before the senior Social Work Practicum. Prerequisites: SWK 352 Social Work Practice III, SWK 362 Social Welfare Policies and Services II, and SWK 406 Methods of Social and Behavioral Research II.

SWK497. Senior Social Work Practicum. 9 hours. Su., F., Sp.
A professional field experience under the supervision of an experienced professional, carefully selected and approved by the University. Placement possibilities include public welfare, mental health, recreational, and community services. A minimum of 400 clock hours of field activity are required. Prerequisites: SWK 454 Seminar in Social Work Practice and admission to the program.